Restaurant

5 “Must Eats” If you Visit Quebec

The great thing about traveling to Quebec is that the city is a melting pot.  This is a modern city suspended in time: a mix of Old World traditions and contemporary sensibilities.  And in no way is this, perhaps, any more clear than in the cuisine you would find throughout this region of Canada.  Pay a visit to a Ben et Florentine franchise, for example, and you will find an eclectic menu that brings these two ideas together to offer you both classic and modern plates beloved by tourists and locals alike.

The POUTINE

If Canada had an “official national dish” this would be it.  The poutine is, basically, classic Canadian comfort food. The dish consists of medium-thick-cut potatoes twice fried and then topped with cheese curds and brown gravy.  Sure, it may not beckon to traditional French culinary tradition, but this savory dish is internationally favored.

The TOURTIERE

While the Poutine may be, perhaps, the most popular dish in Canada, the Tourtiere could be the second most popular. Actually, it could depend on the time of year; you see, the Tourtiere is an extremely popular dish during the Winter holidays.  This dish consists of finely-diced pork and/or veal and/or beef; the mix seasoned with a collection of “secret” spices and then served with a dollop of ketchup.  The dish is actually so popular that each family has their own version of this recipe so be sure to remember that it might be a little different each time you eat it, depending upon where you might have ordered it.

SHISH TAUOK

It seems like you cant really qualify as a bustling cosmopolitan city with an official “street meat.”  In New York this has long been the hot dog—though now it might be the gyro—while in San Diego this would be the “street taco.”  In Montreal, this would be Shish Tauok.  If you have ever had a chicken shwarma, it would closely resemble this:  boneless marinated chicken roasted on a vertical spit and then shaved into pita bread.  

TIRE SURE LA NEIGE

This one is simple:  maple syrup taffy.  But it is more than just “candy.” Traditionally, you boil maple and pull it directly into fresh snow.  Maple is actually quite a common component of menu dishes in this region.

 

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Amy Cairns

Amy Cairns